Introduction To Stone Masonry With Nigel

Posted in the category Stonemasonry by Eilidh Fridlington
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A pictorial blog post showing the creation of an ovolo mould in Maltese limestone by a client on a recent Introduction To Stonemasonry course.

Working a marginal draft in stone

Everything in stonemasonry is a flat surface, so the first thing to do is work a marginal draft along the side of the stone to practise this. The draft is worked with a one inch chisel and mallet.


Working drafts around the initial chamfer

The first stage in working an ovolo mould is an initial chamfer. The chamfer is created by first working a marginal draft around it’s perimeter, then the centre is worked flat using the outer drafts as guides.


A fillet being worked with a half inch chisel and mallet.

With the chamfer worked, the fillets are next. Fillets are considered to be one of the hardest things in stonemasonry because of the fact there are two joining surfaces. However, if they are worked as two separate drafts then joined together, it makes it easier.


A series of chamfers are worked around the outside of the curve

With both of the fillets worked, a series of chamfers is now worked around the curve of the mould. Each chamfer is checked for trueness with a straight edge. At first there are two chamfers, these then become four, and so on.


The finished ovolo mould worked along the front of the stone

With the chamfers worked to a point that they start to become a curve, the mould is rubbed round with a tungsten rubbing block.


The mitre is now marked on the front face of the stone

The straight through return is now marked on, together with it’s associated chamfer.


The fillets on the return are now worked

With the chamfer of the return removed, the fillets are marked on and worked.


Return chamfers worked

A series of chamfers are now worked on the return.


The finished return mould

As with the front face of the stone, when the chamfers start to take on the curve of the mould, it’s rubbed round with a tungsten rubbing block.


Return and stop mitre and chamfer marked on

The opposite return is now marked on, the previous return was straight through, but in this case it’s a return and stop.


The return and stop chamfer is worked.

The chamfer of the return and stop is now worked.


With the chamfer of the return and stop worked, the fillets are now marked on and worked.


The finished moulding with return and stop

As with the opposite return, a series of chamfers were worked until it took on the curve of the mould. After this it was rubbed round with a tungsten rubbing block.


2 comments on Introduction To Stone Masonry With Nigel

Nigel Stainton on 14th July 2017 at 6:25pm

This was a really interesting course I managed to learn a lot whilst still having a laugh I would certainly recommend this course thank you Eilidh

Eilidh Fridlington on 14th July 2017 at 7:30pm

Thank you for the comment, Nigel; I’m glad you enjoyed yourself.

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